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Living History.

Take a trip down memory lane with us. We’ll show you some of the stops Texas Iron & Metal has made along the way.

1920s1939

“It all started in the back of a pick-up.”
Texas Iron & Metal’s history is not
illustrious. It is humble and befitting the American Dream. The business began in the 1920’s when a man named Max Moore dreamed of owning a busines and taking care of his family, and so he did. Max began the business out of his home, buying and selling metal out of the back of his pickup truck.


After almost a decade of running the business from his truck, Max Moore proudly opened the doors on Texas Iron & Metal’s first location. He built a strong business, laying the groundwork for generations to come.

1940s 1950s1960s to 1980s

During World War II, Texas Iron & Metal
did their part to support the US. They did this both by donating scrap metal to the war effort and selling usable products to the industrial community in a time it was not readily available.

Throughout the next couple decades,
Texas Iron & Metal grew as a
company. It moved away from the
scrap metal industry, and grew its
stake in surplus steel.

1980sToday

In the late 1980s, Max Reichenthal took over as president of Texas Iron & Metal. He became the 3rd generation to run the business, continuing the legacy that his namesake had begun over 50 years before.

Today, Texas Iron & Metal’s legacy of providing great products and services to its customers continues. At the helm sits Max Reichenthal, who continues to grow the business.

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Max Moore, founder of Texas Iron & Metal.

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Texas Iron & Metal has been selling to the community for over 75 years. Houston has come a long way, as seen in this early aerial photo taken in the 1930s.

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Max Moore (pictured sixth from the right) and others pictured, donated the first carload of scrap to Sheffield Steel for the war effort.

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Texas Iron & Metal moves from the bed of a pick-up truck to its first location in 1939.

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Max Moore (left), his sons Alex and JoJo, and wife Florence.

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Early photo of the Texas Iron & Metal scrapyard.

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Siblings JoJo, Evelyn and Alex Moore, during the 1940s. Evelyn later married Sidney Reichenthal.

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Alex “Spook” Moore and a Texas Iron & Metal employee having fun in the scrapyard.

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Texas Iron & Metal scrapyard in the 1940s. Available scrap was limited at this time because of World War II.

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Texas Iron & Metal was the first salvage yard in Houston. The usable inventory was separated from the scrap and some was sold for commercial usage. This was very important to the community at a time when most steel was being used for the war effort and not always readily available to commercial buyers.

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In the early 1940s, new and used metal was in short supply, but Texas Iron & Metal worked hard to supply steel to their commercial and industrial customers.

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Metal in the scrapyard was sorted and organized, ready to be sold for customers’ use.

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Texas Iron & Metal loaded trucks with scrap to assist in the war effort.

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Between 1960 and 1980, Texas Iron & Metal expanded their services to include surplus steel. In 1954, Texas Iron & Metal moved to their current location.

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“Shorty” hard at work.

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Former owner, Max Moore, whose grandson, Max Reichenthal, now owns Texas Iron & Metal.

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Men on the job at Texas Iron & Metal.

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Texas Iron & Metal’s logo in the 1980s.

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Texas Iron & Metal owner Max Reichenthal and his father, Sidney.

713.672.0653 fax
865 Lockwood Drive
Houston, Texas 77020

Open Monday - Friday
7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.